Mark Radcliffe | Senior Partner | DLA Piper

Mark Radcliffe is a senior partner who practices corporate securities and intellectual property law at DLA Piper. He also serves as outside General Counsel for the Open Source Initiative and is Chair of the Open Source Industry Group at the firm. Mark was the Chair of Committee C for the Free Software Foundation in reviewing GPLv3, assisted Sun Microsystems in open sourcing the Solaris operating system and drafting the CDDL. He currently represents large companies in their open source matters including eBay, Accenture, Adobe, Palm and Sony, along with startups including SugarCRM, DotNetNuke, Cleversafe and rSmart. He writes frequently on his blog and has participated in a series of webinars on open source legal issues with Black Duck.

Recent Posts

The year 2016 resulted in several important developments that affect the FOSS ecosystem but are not strictly “legal developments,” but are important for the community. Important Developments in Free / Open Source Software Eben Moglen, the general counsel of the Free Software Foundation, stepped

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In 2015 there were a variety of legal issues of importance to the FOSS (free and open source) community. Continuing the tradition of looking back over the top ten legal developments in FOSS, my selection of the top ten issues for 2015 is as follows: 1. Settlement of Versata cases interpreting

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Versata Software, Inc. (“Versata”) learned the cost of failing to manage free and open source software (FOSS): Versata’s routine attempt to terminate the license for its proprietary DCM software with Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (“Ameriprise”) exploded into three other lawsuits and resulted in eight

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The recent Fantec decision in Germany emphasizes the need for companies to manage their use of FOSS and cannot rely on statements from their suppliers. The court was very clear about this requirement and dismissed Fantec’s attempted defense based on the additional cost of their own compliance.

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Talend, a licensor of open source enterprise software, has recently received a ruling from the U.S. Customs Service corroborating that its software complies with the Trade Agreements Act 0f 1979 (19 USC 2511 et seq.) (“TAA”). Open source software adoption by the US Federal government must comply

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